Best Places to Work in Idaho

Each year for the past 5 years, I have had the honor of emceeing the state’s largest employer recognition event, Best Places to Work in Idaho.

The Best Places to Work in Idaho program is unlike any other. The producer, Populous, works with employers across the state of Idaho to survey employees and uses that data to identify the top 10 employers in five categories: Micro 10-19 employees; Small 20-49 employees; Medium 50-99 employees; Large 100-249 employees; Macro 249+ employees.

Because this recognition is purely data-driven, no business can “buy” their way into the recognition list. Since the programs inception 10 years ago, 553 Idaho business have participated and 77,568 Idaho employees have been surveyed.

What does this have to do with theater, you might ask? EVERYTHING!

In preparation to emcee such a prestigious event, I like to do my research. I delve into the winning companies websites – specifically the Human Resources and Careers pages. I read open job descriptions and I look for online reviews. What I learn from this research strengthens my belief that a theater arts education can and WILL prepare future business leaders, innovators and entrepreneurs.

The top 10 skills an employer is seeking:

  1. Communication skills — Listening, speaking and writing. Employers want people who can accurately interpret what others are saying and organize and express their thoughts clearly.
    THEATER EDUCATION TEACHES THESE SKILLS!
  2. Teamwork — In today’s work environment, many jobs involve working in one or more groups. Employers want someone who can bring out the best in others.
    THEATER EDUCATION TEACHES THESE SKILLS!
  3. Analytical and problem-solving skills — Employers want people who can use creativity, reasoning and past experiences to identify and solve problems effectively.
    THEATER EDUCATION TEACHES THESE SKILLS!
  4. Personal management skills — The ability to plan and manage multiple assignments and tasks, set priorities and adapt to changing conditions and work assignments.
    THEATER EDUCATION TEACHES THESE SKILLS!
  5. Interpersonal effectiveness — Employers usually note whether an employee can relate to co-workers and build relationships with others in the organization.
    THEATER EDUCATION TEACHES THESE SKILLS! – I think you’re catching on! 🙂
  6. Computer/technical literacy — Although employers expect to provide training on job-specific software, they also expect employees to be proficient with basic computer skills.
    THEATER EDUCATION, specifically technical theater but also actor preparation and theater management TEACHES THESE SKILLS!
  7. Leadership/management skills — The ability to take charge and manage your co-workers, if required, is a welcome trait. Most employers look for signs of leadership qualities.
    THEATER EDUCATION TEACHES THESE SKILLS!
  8. Learning skills — Jobs are constantly changing and evolving, and employers want people who can grow and learn as changes come.
    THEATER EDUCATION TEACHES THESE SKILLS!
  9. Academic competence in reading and math — Although most jobs don’t require calculus, almost all jobs require the ability to read and comprehend  instructions and perform basic math.
    STUDENTS WHO HAVE AN ARTS-RICH EDUCATION outperform students in math and verbal skills and consistently score higher on standardized tests!
  10. Strong work values — Dependability, honesty, selfconfidence and a positive attitude are prized qualities in any profession. Employers look for personal integrity.
    THEATER EDUCATION TEACHES THESE SKILLS!

If you want to know more about how a THEATER EDUCATION prepares a young person to lead and have a successful career, check out some of the resources below or, better yet, enroll your child in a TVCT Theater Program and see for yourself!

Resources:

Americans for the Arts: 10 Reasons to Support the Arts

The Artistic Edge: 10 Skills Children Learn from the Arts (join her email list, it’s incredible)!

Arts Education Partnership: Preparing Students for the Next America

The National Assembly of State Arts Agencies: Critical Evidence – How the Arts Benefit Student Achievement